A Simplified Life

I’m uncertain as to when or how it started. I think it may have always been present with me. The day my life forever changed….

I realized that all I really want is a small, slow, simple life! I am most content in the space of routine and ordinary. It’s here where I recognize the truly spectacular events may be a rainy afternoon and a good book, or a lingering lunch with a friend or loved one where we reminisce about the goodness of God in our lives or the moments that He has given that have taken our breath away. It’s where my calm lives.

I have chosen a lifestyle of moderation and I have peace with that. I like the ease in managing stress and learning to choose the paths and places that maintain this level of quiet in my life. It allows me to reserve my energy for the unplanned and unexpected moments where calm is a true asset for responding in a manner I will be happy with now and in the future.

The world can be a noisy place with loud voices pushing or driving for me to hustle, to improve, build, strive, yearn, acquire, compete, and grasp for more. Make a huge impact in everything I do. Make my life count.

All the striving for excellence can leave me drained of joy and wondering if I am simply not enough. And when I stop spinning and listen for God’s still, small voice, I hear Him whispering for me to ‘cease’ striving and know that He is God.

What if I never really achieve accolades beyond the people who are my primary circle of impact, consistently letting them know they are loved and I would choose them again? What if life as I have chosen it is good, even amazing, in light of the fact that my heart is fully engaged?

What if I simply write as God brings His reflections of beauty to my soul? And what if I have come to accept that the greatest joys and fulfillment come from offering the gifts I have to the community of women I care about encouraging them that bigger isn’t always better? What if I can simply remind those that I invest in that their gifts and influence are far more valuable than what is understood at the time?

What if I simply remain calm and centered and help others to see that they are enough? And, that God in us, provides great hope for others?

What if I just accept this ordinary body of mine that is neither big nor small? And I make peace with it and decide that when I lie on my deathbed I will never regret having just been me.

What if I am a home manager who rarely dusts or vacuums and mostly maintains order and makes real food but sometimes buys pizza and after giving thanks to God for all things, I simply enjoy and do not feel guilty?

What if I make plans and budgets and then occasionally break my own rules and push back against rigidity. Is it really a big deal if I’m not into fancy or expensive things? Or that I like a small and safe home?

Since leaving the frantic pace of life and learning to not keep up, I have found that I need tons of solitude and calm, an abundance of rest, and swaths of unscheduled time in order to be healthy.

Having given up my former dogmatic state of being, I have found great delight in sharing my deeply rooted faith, doubts and insecurities, in quiet ways and through genuine relationship. I have some very special women in my life who have guided me to this and each of you know who you are!

We haven’t had a fairy tale romance and I follow hard after God to be the wife that will always be for Jeff’s best. This keeps me humble and I need it!

I am a mom who delights in her girls and in knowing they are free to choose their appointments with life. I consider it a special privilege to affirm and support them in their passions?

I seek the Lord often to learn to embrace my limitations and stop railing against them. I am at peace with who I am and what I need and believe it to be an amazing gift of God to walk in this knowledge.

I want a small, slow, simple life. A mediocre life. A beautiful, quiet, gentle life.

And for me, it is enough!

Sheri Geyer is a Christian Life Coach / Mentor, Realtor, Writer, Wife & Mom.

What I Love About….Coming Home

What I love about Sundays:

The meaningful conversations that can happen when we unplug from the weekday routine.

Today, Mama wanted to talk about her cancer and God wanted to encourage my heart through the words and bonding that occurred.

This the the 2-year Anniversary Month of my coming back home to a world I grew up in and having heard all my life that “you can never go back home”, I have to say that (if God leads), I wholeheartedly DISAGREE!

Although, I didn’t roam too far (Atlanta), I find that the culture and speed of life here in Savannah is where my heart truly has always resided.

In our ‘Friendly City’, folks still take time to ‘shoot the breeze’ and take time for the simple treasures. Everywhere I go, (Grocery store, Church, my neighborhood), people are pooling resources to send to the many folks affected by Hurricane Harvey.

In my neighborhood, folks stop and chat and watch out for one another. It’s a treat to welcome new neighbors and help them get to know other neighbors.

My church has truly become Family and the ladies in my Connect Group have become an amazing support system for me.

I’m close to my brother and sister-in-law and get to enjoy being a part of the lives of two very special nieces! ❤️

My lifelong (since 2nd grade) friend helped me to bridge the years and feel as though I’d never left.

I’ve been blessed with 3 dear women who are CareGiver’s for my mom and they have learned a lot about me and still love me! 😊

And in my work, I am part of a Real Estate Team that I feel a sense of belonging, more like family and ‘Cheers’ and not so much like we are competing against one another.

It’s a joy to be a part of a community where folks open doors, offer umbrellas and say ‘Please and Thank You’ routinely.

The closest thing to heaven that I’ve experienced so far, is coming home! Thank YOU, Lord!

And can someone please pass the Grits! 😊❤️

Sheri Geyer is a Christian Life Coach, Realtor, Mentor, Writer, Minimalist, Wife & Mom

Today is my Favorite Day!

Perhaps, you’ve said or thought that happiness is something that must be achieved:

“When this is done, I’ll be happy.”

“When I own that, I’ll be happy.”

“When I weigh less, I’ll be happy.”

As I’ve chosen my path to growing in intimacy with God, I’ve learned that I can choose happiness in any given moment. In working to take control of my thoughts and actions based on truths from Scripture, I have become much more satisfied with my life.

Some actions were obvious good choices: going to bed earlier, exercising routinely, being in the moment and enjoying now, sing to my favorite music in the shower… 

A few other actions were counterintuitive at first: handling a nagging task, looking for the lessons in failed efforts, avoiding the temptation to gossip, and decluttering my home, life and schedule. 

Adopting a mindset to “Enjoy this Moment,” has made one of the biggest differences in transforming my thinking. 

I find pleasure in gradual progress and not just the moment of crossing a finish line. To my favorite mantra, “Life is Good”, I’ve even added, “Today is my favorite day.” It helps me to remember to enjoy this moment. 

If a task can be done in under a minute I avoid the temptation to postpone it. I use a five to ten-minute guideline to tidy up my ‘world’, wherever needed, each morning and evening. Putting things in order is very calming and helps me sleep better. And since I work from home, my mornings are more pleasant when things are in order.

My husband and I have our own business and we care for my mom who has Alzheimer’s and lives with us. Order and routine are golden! 

To enjoy the moments I am given, clearing clutter, taking life in a lighthearted manner, getting more sleep, and responding to daily challenges in love, have brought much joy and happiness to my moments and therefore, ‘Today’, is my favorite Day!

Adding to my purposeful daily habits, I actively seek and find fun as often as I can in life, work and especially in play. It’s okay to be silly and to go off the path and do the unexpected. These are key sources of enjoying this moment.

Choosing happiness is about both actions and attitudes. If my attitude isn’t one of joy, I evaluate what I need to do: do I need to laugh more, be kinder, stop being critical, be more cheerful? And even when I don’t FEEL like it, I take control of my emotions and do the next basic ‘right’ thing, like it or not. And my feelings eventually catch up!

On a routine basis, I make the choice to appreciate my life right now, just as it is, and that makes me happy and allows me to have joy regardless of my circumstances or how I feel. 

Every day you can choose happiness. Today can be your favorite day!

Sheri Geyer is a Christian Life Coach, Mentor, Realtor, Wife & Mom

Keeping it Simple

We often think of simplifying, down-sizing or minimizing our external possessions and living with only the essentials as denying ourselves of the good life. This journey isn’t so much about eliminating the number of shoes or books we own, how small the square footage of our house can be or giving away every non-essential item we own. It may be all of that, if there’s a deeper-seated issue that keeps us from a sense of gratitude and enjoyment of the things that we say are most important to us.

The quest for the true joy of not being “owned” by too much stuff and the required maintenance as well as an often overcommitted schedule required me to look deep internally. At which point, I discovered a dis-ordered heart.

For me, living an abundant life is a journey of intentional growth and learning to authentically live a simple life. Simplicity has become the clarity in which I find meaning. It’s the removal of the unnecessary. It’s the discovery of what I value most.

5 simple ways to live an abundant life through keeping it simple.

1. Simplify your wardrobeAdopting a minimal wardrobe has afforded me less stress when choosing what to wear each day. Eliminating items I rarely wear and only purchasing clothing, shoes and accessories that I feel most like myself in has given me more time each morning for the people and things I value.

2. Eliminate digital distractions. When meeting with someone, I intentionally allow my phone to take a coffee break. For me, multi-tasking simply means I am able to screw up two things at once! I work when I’m at work. I am intentional when I am in a meeting. I continually strive to remember that I own the phone, it does not own me!

3. Learn to be vacationally-minded in your work.  Changing the mindset in how we view our work can transform the way we work. It no longer becomes a balancing act of life and work, it becomes the essence of life itself. God designed us to create! Realizing that creating is our work makes getting up in the morning a lot easier. If the goal is only for a promotion, prestigious title, or a larger paycheck, it will not be enough to fulfill us in the long run. On vacation, we are intentional in getting the most out of the moment and creating the memories we want to keep. Focusing on the difference we can make by the work only we can do allows us to realize the value that only we can bring to our organization.

4. Learn to say no to things. It’s tempting to believe that saying yes to everything is the path to success. Often, in not wanting to miss anything, we sign up to do everything. These commitments and obligations can cause unnecessary stress and friction in our relationships with family, friends, and colleagues. The ability to say no provides space to focus on the things we value most. It’s not about being involved in everything, but rather learning not to trade off the “best” and settle for “good”.

5. Embrace the mundane. Life is truly lived in the morning coffee chats on the porch, car rides to school or work, standing in the grocery line talking to a neighbor, reading to your kids before bed time, caring for a loved one, walking the dog, and clearing off the dinner table as a family. It’s in the moments we often hurry past. These are the simple memories that last a lifetime. These are the experiences that write our story and shape our lives. It’s these simple things that matter and become the things we appreciate most.

I did not intentionally set out on a journey to simplicity, but in so doing, I can honestly say, I have found true abundance.

I invite you to consider what ‘keeping it simple’ could mean for you…

Sheri Geyer is a Realtor & Christian Life Coach

If you’ve enjoyed this, please share! @Sheri_Geyer

How Does My Heart Grow? 

*This writing was inspired by my friend Brande ❤

Being easily offended or defensive when someone has a different opinion that does not support our views is a negative response that hinders emotional maturity. 

Allowing respectful diverse view points into our thinking helps us grow and gain insight from different perspectives. Limiting ourselves to ideas only from people who agree with us can inhibit or destroy significant relationships.

Assuming that we are being rejected if others do not perform as we desire or show support in our endeavors results in unhealthy thought processes. 

If we work to communicate with one another with kindness, patience, and understanding, we can cultivate ways to operate in love and empathy, opening opportunities for growth and strong relationships that impact us personally, spiritually and professionally. 

Might it be possible that God intended diversity to mature and teach us how to love in a way that transforms us as well as others? 

I believe it is worth pondering… 

Sheri Geyer is a Realtor & Christian Life Coach

If you’ve enjoyed this, please share! @Sheri_Geyer

Regret: Can We Avoid It?

We often hope, whether stated or not, that we never have to experience regret. Often, our biggest challenge (to avoid regret) is when we stand at a place where we know God desires us to surrender to Him. Surrender for a believer is perpetual. This boils down to a question of our wills. It is easy to hesitate for fear of what others will think or how they will be impacted. Or how we may be judged.

‘Life” is what happens while we are busy making other plans. One guarantee in life is that it eventually lands us in places we never imagined, both as a result of choices we make, and for purposes which God intends. Our response to it will determine the altitude with which we cruise through and whether we are strengthened during the process. Or whether we crash and burn and then have to pick up the pieces and begin again.

In this life, regret can be defined as grief, sorrow; and pain of mind. Even having a sincere desire to do our best in life, since we are unable to see the future, we will likely make some choices that we may regret. The level of discomfort or sorrow we feel is likely to be directly in proportion to the motive of our effort more than anything. If we truly did our best and things didn’t go as we had hoped, it is often easier to forgive ourselves and move on. On the other hand, if we were warned, we may have a longer journey to reach the point of putting the difficult season behind us and moving on to a better place as well as to the necessary healing.

So if we are unable to completely avoid regret, what can we do when we experience it?

Avoid indulging it. Imagine you are swimming in the ocean and your feet have become entangled in seaweed. The seaweed is “regret” (apply this reflection to anywhere you may feel stuck). You tug and swim harder, yet you are still unable to move forward with the seaweed wrapped heavily around your feet. Indulging a regret, means we go over and over it, analyzing every detail, and becoming more tangled by replaying in our minds all the “woulda-shoulda-and-coulda(s)”. We may hold on to it becoming identified with it which can cause us to feel paralyzed or victimized.

Be honest with where we are and learn to make new choices. We have the choice to simply look at it, feel it, accept it, learn from it, and when ready, untie it and swim on. Repressing our regrets, on the other hand, creates a different problem because we believe we are actually “getting on with life”. Yet, by ignoring the feelings that need to be felt, we tend to harden our hearts over time. Acknowledging our regrets, helps us face and feel them, learn from them and make good wherever possible. We can then forgive ourselves and others and find healing, rather than be held hostage to our past.

Just do the work without worrying about the timing. We like to have timelines attached to transformation. If you’re like me, you would love to know when you will finally be done with a particular regret and freely swimming on. The best way to gain what we need from the situation is to focus on the work, and let go of expectations around outcome and timing. Our work is to shed layers that get in the way of living and showing up fully. Any time it may arise, we can simply notice it, allow it to deepen our experience of vulnerability and humility, and grow in integrity.

You don’t have to do it alone. Speak your regret out loud to someone close who supports you or write it in a journal between you and God. There is something inherently restorative in either of these acts. At times, if we are able to reflect on the respective journeys we have taken in life with a close friend, with a calm and gentle courage, it builds a strong bond. It’s where we can learn there is a place beyond regret.

A Word of Caution: Don’t assume you know for anotherRegret is a deeply intimate reflection of a particular person’s life, hopes, dreams and choices. Each of us need space and grace to walk this path, some pieces of the journey we may find we need to be alone with God. At other times, we may be more comfortable sharing the burden with a deeply trusted loved one. It is a unique and individual experience. We each can be one who brings hope and encourages healing in our life and in the lives of others.

Once we have allowed regret to change from something that drags us down and overwhelms us, we can experience growth that can make us more sensitive, kind and caring… a true refreshing breath to others.

Regret may linger for a season, but it loses its sting! 

Sheri Geyer is a Realtor & Christian Life Coach

If you’ve enjoyed this, please share! @Sheri_Geyer

Begin with the End in Mind

How often do we neglect developing new habits because we think a positive outcome will take too much effort? Or maybe we start to improve our lifestyle only to give up prematurely because we don’t get what we want fast enough. It’s easy to allow today’s challenges to become tomorrow’s excuses.

Have you wondered how you became  a member of the Start-Big-Finish-Small-if-at-All-Club? Perhaps, you’ve set targets that are difficult to reach. Often, the pain of disappointment may leave you feeling burned out with little desire to follow through. Remember, you do have options. The breakthrough you’ve needed could be to practice thinking small to help you transform your life.

Often, we may be full of ideas and eager to establish a new plan. We may soon realize it’s easy to bite off more than we can chew. We want rapid success and no hitches. The size of the task and the time it takes to get there may make it tempting to throw in the towel. It may be frustrating trying to determine the best steps as opposed to just doing more believing this equates to doing better. By focusing more on the here and now, it is easier to find a steady pace that is easier to adjust to. Besides, it worked for the tortoise!

Whatever you hope to gain in your endeavors, you need to decide precisely what it is you want, and be specific as you define what exactly it is you hope to achieve. Reflect in why you desire this outcome. Goals are often more “real” if they are written. Decide what is a reasonable length of time to realize your desire and be realistic. Make it measurable so you will have a target at which to aim. Once you have a clearly defined idea of the what, why and how long to reach your goal, you can break down the entire process.

Here are a few tips for breaking it down into bite-size pieces:

1. Brainstorm all of your options and determine what can be divided into smaller, detailed steps. Each task is a stepping stone towards achieving your end result.

2. Simplify the action plan. Think of the steps as actions. When you understand what actions are needed to achieve your desired result, you can pull these together into a plan.

3. Establish daily and weekly tasks. When you create your action plan, work out a series of targets that you believe are possible to reach on the way to your goal. Keep it simple with many small victories to keep the momentum.

4. Keep on track. The small-scale approach is flexible and allows for instant changes.  Continue tweaking and completing the simple tasks so the end result will be well within your grasp.

5. Focus on your daily actions plans and not so much on the end date. Like the tortoise, concentrate on one small step and repeat consistently.

6. Master the art of delaying gratification. Though you may be tempted, avoid trying to rush things and bite off more than you can chew. Refer to the reasons why you want the desired goal. Concentrate on where you are in the journey, and not on what’s next. Reflect on how far you’ve come and what a waste it would be to throw in the towel.

In order for us to grow, we will need to allow ourselves to be stretched at times. In most endeavors, if we don’t grow, our plans and goals won’t either. Long-lasting lifestyle change requires an investment of your time and effort, as well as some patience. The road to achieving great things is much less intimidating when you break down the end result into smaller steps.

And absolutely nothing can compare to how you will feel when you finally make it to the place you wanted to be.

Sheri Geyer is a Realtor & Life Coach

If you’ve enjoyed this, please share! @Sheri_Geyer

The Power of Listening

I have often found it hard to avoid the temptation of telling people how to do something they are attempting to do in a different way. Different from the way I do it, of course! It has to be easier or I wouldn’t be doing it this way, right? At least, that is what the logical sense side of my brain screams to me. It almost seems natural to tell others our way of doing, seeing, being, etc. 

What I have been slow to learn is that we all have ideas on how to do something and many times if we are just present with someone and observing their efforts, we bring a lot to the table. Many of us are overdue for a few “attaboy” pats on the back and are overwhelmed with the telling feature of others.

I’ve learned that asking people questions about what they are doing or how they decided to do a certain task or project is a great way to offer encouragement and acceptance. I am now convinced that people need encouragement much more than they need instruction.

Asking a question and then giving someone the latitude to share their thoughts on it offers acceptance of the differences we have from others. Listening without mentally focusing on how we are going to tell them to do it a better way can bond us together in deeper ways. Active listening offers people the respect and courtesy to share their hearts and ideas without feeling corrected or as if they are in need of “fixing”.

I’ve heard it said that if you give someone 15 minutes to speak, they will tell you everything that is important to them. How much more value could we bring to our relationships if we offered the gift of listening to people who are important to us, and then using what we learn to offer encouragement in their endeavors?

Think about it. People often point out the mistakes, flaws and errors they see in others or in situations. How often do you hear someone comment on how enjoyable something they experienced proved to be? It’s refreshing, but rare.

Take every opportunity to develop the strength of character that is found in truly listening. People will be drawn to you as you, in turn, encourage them and open your heart to share the things you value.

If we pass this idea on to others, we may just find that listening is the most favored of all of the love languages.

Oh, and thanks for listening to my ramblings!

Sheri Geyer is a Realtor and Christian Life Coach.

If this has been an encouragement to you, please share @Sheri_Geyer. Thank you!

Roll with it, Baby!

Each day brings a variety of events. Some routine and anticipated things and some possible surprises. There is a strong temptation to judge the unanticipated happenings as bad or negative. We may feel it necessary to try to fight or run from these situations rather than embrace them for the good we can learn from them. 

We are unable to control or have advance notice on all that happens. We do have the advantage of controlling what we choose to think and do about everything that does happen. 

Even when we face negative situations, we can respond in ways that are helpful and beneficial. Developing a resolve to follow our purpose can be a strong motivator to not let our circumstances deter us from what we deem to be worthy of our most firm commitments. 

While the wind will vary its direction, by changing our sails we can allow our ship to maintain its course.

We can make a determination of what we will do with each day and the purpose we will follow for our life, and decide to live true to these choices. We will be surprised what we can do when we have the ‘want to’!

Sheri Geyer is a Realtor and Life Coach. 

If this has been an encouragement to you, please share @Sheri_Geyer. Thank you!